Pittsburgh ordinance would make building utility information public

The Performance and Asset Management Committee of Pittsburgh City Council voted on an ordinance Tuesday that would publicly disclose utility information of city-owned buildings. 

Modeled after other cities around the country like Boston and New York, the energy benchmarking and disclosure ordinance will make city facilities list energy usage information, water usage, and gas information in an effort to create more transparency and to incentivize those buildings to reduce utility costs, by June 2017. 

Wednesday, October 12, 2016/Author: Alanna Koll
Categories: Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh Profiles: Meet Pittsburgh City Councilwoman Deborah Gross (District 7)

Pittsburgh Profiles: Meet Pittsburgh City Councilwoman Deborah Gross (District 7)

With a passion for neighborhood development and supporting small businesses, find out how this once grassroots community organizer provides her expertise to an ever expanding Pittsburgh.

Friday, October 7, 2016/Author: Alanna Koll
Categories: Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh Councilwoman wants to see development slow down in the Strip District

Legislation that calls for certain city-owned properties to be sold to Pittsburgh’s Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) for $1 a piece was the topic of Wednesday’s Finance and Law Committee of City Council. 

The proposed sale of twelve specified properties to the URA comes with the goal of returning those properties back to the tax rolls to generate revenue for the city budget and using the sales proceeds to generate funding for the city’s facilities maintenance fund. 

The 12 properties set to be sold include parking lots and empty buildings in Hazelwood, Downtown, Uptown and the Strip District. 

Thursday, September 15, 2016/Author: Alanna Koll
Categories: Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh City Council considers use of private service to raise business tax collections

The Finance and Law Committee of Pittsburgh City Council met Wednesday to consider legislation that would hire an outside taxpayer location service to track down and collect delinquent taxes owed to the city. 

The committee agreed to a three-year contract with MuniServices and would pay the company a  one-time $70,000 fee, plus 32.4 percent of new tax revenue it collects during a given year. After the first year, the city will receive 100 percent of the findings. 

The legislation also calls for MuniServices to train city employees to use the internet, social media, and other electronic means to find businesses dodging their tax payments.
Wednesday, September 7, 2016/Author: Alanna Koll
Categories: Pittsburgh
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