Despite big election swing, Senate leadership unchanged

While the Pennsylvania Senate had its biggest electoral swing since 1954, it was not roiled by the same number of leadership changes as in the House.

While eight incumbent senators, all Republicans, either retired, resigned, ran for higher office or lost an election, the chamber only lost one minor leadership figure: Sen. Chuck McIlhinney (R-Bucks), the caucus administrator, who retired.

Wednesday, November 14, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
Southeast takes center stage as Democrats make big General Assembly gains, though Republicans hold majorities

Southeast takes center stage as Democrats make big General Assembly gains, though Republicans hold majorities

Riding discontent in the Philadelphia suburbs, Democrats picked up 16 seats between the Pennsylvania House and Senate on Tuesday, besting nine incumbents and breaking the GOP Senate supermajority in a big night for the party that had been whittled down to historic lows in both chambers.

Republicans will keep a majority in both chambers, but they’ll be smaller and missing some of the moderates who formerly thrived around West Chester, Norristown and Media.
Wednesday, November 7, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
Open House seats could play big role in Democratic gains

Open House seats could play big role in Democratic gains

Projections made a week out from Election Day by one state election modeler give Democrats a one-in-seven chance of flipping the state House.

That’s a decrease from an earlier projection made by Carl Klarner, a former Indiana State political science professor. Formerly, his model, based off of previous election results and other measurables, gave Democrats a little less than a one-in-four chance.
Monday, November 5, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Doorbells ring, candidates rally and voters decide to split or not to split ahead of Tuesday

Doorbells ring, candidates rally and voters decide to split or not to split ahead of Tuesday

Knocking on doors is tedious in Upper Mount Bethel, a sleepy rural township of almost 7,000. But as dusk falls on Friday, Amy Cozze’s minivan pulls up to a wooden home, and she hops out to meet another voter.

The 35-year-old baker and breast cancer survivor is trying to flip the seat from red to blue while facing an entrenched incumbent. Rep. Joe Emrick (R-Northampton) has served since winning in 2010, during the Tea Party movement that took over Congress and state Houses across the country. Since then, no Democrat has broken 40 percent of the vote again him.


But Cozze is one of the Democrats running to try and win power back, hoping that enthusiasm, the top of the ballot, and some door-to-door coaxing of ticket splitting Democrats can bring results, while Republicans look to leverage a growing economy to hold their ground.
Sunday, November 4, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
Turzai faces Skopov, Williams battles Shaffer at candidate forum

Turzai faces Skopov, Williams battles Shaffer at candidate forum

Two sets of candidates in top-tier state races traded blows Thursday night at a forum in the northern Pittsburgh suburbs.

For the 38th Senate District, Democratic candidate Lindsey Williams and Republican Jeremy Shaffer debated for the first half, while in the 28th House District, Speaker of the House Mike Turzai faced off with challenger Emily Skopov on questions around gun control, redistricting and education spending.
Saturday, November 3, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
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