Bill to eliminate future Keystone Exam development, provide graduation requirement flexibility to career and technical students begins legislative journey

Bill to eliminate future Keystone Exam development, provide graduation requirement flexibility to career and technical students begins legislative journey

The House Education Committee Monday unanimously approved House Bill 2381, legislation introduced by Speaker Mike Turzai (R-Allegheny) that would provide graduation requirement flexibility to students enrolled in career and technical education (CTE) and eliminate the statutory requirement of the development of seven additional Keystone Exams.

Monday, October 17, 2016/Author: Jason Gottesman
Categories: News and Views
Summer Session: Rep. Stan Saylor (R-York)

Summer Session: Rep. Stan Saylor (R-York)

The PLS Reporter joined Rep. Stan Saylor (R-York) at his district office to find out what he has been doing since the legislature left the Capitol in July. 

Rep. Saylor said his busy days in his district office is his favorite part of his job.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016/Author: Kara Barmoy
Categories: Video
Lawmakers examine new education funding scheme

Lawmakers examine new education funding scheme

While House Bill 1552 sits on the Governor’s desk, the Education committee had a hearing regarding a new Basic Education Funding formula.

A new proposal, drafted by Rep. David Parker (R-Monroe), will look to implement new ideas to benefit schools burdened by hold harmless provisions even though the Basic Education Funding Commissions formula has only been around for one fiscal year.

Thursday, May 26, 2016/Author: Kyle Maguire
House Education Chair: 95 percent of school districts able to stay open until October

House Education Chair: 95 percent of school districts able to stay open until October

As Pennsylvania’s state budget impasse continues to drag on into the start of the school year and districts begin to plan for contingencies in case the stalemate continues, House Education Committee Chairman Stan Saylor (R-York) said Monday that around 95 percent of Pennsylvania’s school districts will likely to survive until October without state funding.

“Statewide I have not seen a school district that can’t open [on time],” he told a small group of reporters following Monday’s Pennsylvania Press Club luncheon featuring Education Sec. Pedro Rivera. “I think the school districts as a whole, the majority—I mean great majority—I’m going to say 95 percent of them probably can survive into October without taking a loan, possibly.”

He added those that are more financially distressed might have to go out for a line of credit a little sooner.

Currently, he noted school districts have already started to collect property taxes and other sources of their own revenue.

Monday, August 24, 2015/Author: Jason Gottesman
Categories: News and Views
Educators, administrators pan state assessments at House hearing

Educators, administrators pan state assessments at House hearing

The House Education Committee held a marathon hearing Wednesday getting input on state education assessments from frontline players who deliver and develop the tests. Most testifiers panned the state assessments as costly, unnecessary, and misapplied.

The committee’s aim was not to take testimony on any specific bill, but to get a ground-level understanding of what the tests do, how they’re viewed, and whether students are prepared for them.

“What we wanted to hear today is what exactly we Pennsylvania are required to do in terms of testing as far as the federal government requirements are concerned, what’s been going on at PDE and the Board of Education, but also to hear from different teachers, superintendents, and board members as to exactly what’s going on in each of the districts,” said Chairman Stan Saylor (R-York). “Let’s hear from individuals who are involved in the testing day in and day out to give us an explanation.”

It was noted the topic of state assessments has drawn a lot of interest lately, particularly in terms of preparedness for the exams after the adoption of Pennsylvania CORE standards in 2013.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015/Author: Jason Gottesman
Categories: News and Views
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