Senate hearings reveal need for more behavioral health services; gun control legislation still in question

Senate hearings reveal need for more behavioral health services; gun control legislation still in question

A spate of marathon Senate Judiciary Committee hearings revealed a glimpse into the complex task of reducing gun violence across the commonwealth, and while panelists appeared to agree on the need for expanded mental health services, the future of gun-related legislation remains in question for members of the General Assembly.  

The long-awaited hearings, promised by Sen. Lisa Baker (R-Luzerne) as a “prelude to action” following two summer mass shootings in the U.S., featured testimony from psychiatrists, gun rights advocates, prosecutors and gun control advocates — who all appeared to agree that residents lack access to mental health care that could reduce instances of violence. 
Wednesday, September 25, 2019/Author: Justin Sweitzer
Categories: News and Views
Senate Judiciary Committee schedules fall hearings on gun violence, mental health

Senate Judiciary Committee schedules fall hearings on gun violence, mental health

As Democratic lawmakers continue to call for gun reforms, Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Lisa Baker (R-Luzerne) this week announced the committee’s fall schedule, promising a series of hearings on gun violence, the statute of limitations and the parole process in Pennsylvania.

After two mass shootings in Ohio and Texas earlier this month, Baker pledged to hold public hearings prior to taking action on gun-related measures. Those hearings will be held on September 24 and September 25 to address “behavioral health, Second Amendment rights and other gun-related issues,” according to a release from her office.
Thursday, August 15, 2019/Author: Justin Sweitzer
Categories: News and Views
Senate Judiciary Committee roundtable calls for more action on criminal justice reform in Pennsylvania

Senate Judiciary Committee roundtable calls for more action on criminal justice reform in Pennsylvania

At a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting Tuesday, held just outside of some of Pittsburgh’s most crime ridden neighborhoods, a panel of state officials and activists talked about how Pennsylvania could reform the commonwealth’s criminal justice system. 

The meeting was the final of three — the first two taking place in Harrisburg and Philadelphia, all organized by Senate Judiciary Committee Majority Chairman Stewart Greenleaf (R-Montgomery). Democratic Senators Sharif Street (D-Philadelphia) and Jay Costa (D-Allegheny) also sat on the panel, held at Petra Ministries, a non-denominational church, in Penn Hills. 

Wednesday, December 6, 2017/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
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