Stephens bill could change bail conditions for repeat DUI offenders

Stephens bill could change bail conditions for repeat DUI offenders

The PLS Reporter sat down with Rep. Todd Stephens (R-Montgomery) to discuss his legislation, House Bill 2538. 

The bill would authorize courts to require an individual to wear an alcohol monitoring device as a condition of bail for repeat DUI offenders.

Monday, August 6, 2018/Author: Kara Barmoy
Categories: Video
Pennsylvania Judges and medical professionals tell House members more treatment will lead to less DUIs

Pennsylvania Judges and medical professionals tell House members more treatment will lead to less DUIs

The consensus among testifiers was for a greater focus on treatment and rehabilitation over incarceration during a joint House committee public hearing in Philadelphia Friday.

Both the Judiciary and Transportation committees allowed two judges, an addiction psychiatrist, a clerk of courts and police lieutenant to share the effects of current driving under the influence (DUI) laws and its related programs effects on repeat offenders.
Friday, April 20, 2018/Author: Taylor Allen
Categories: News and Views

DUI ignition interlock bill seems like all but a done deal

As promised, Sen. John Rafferty (R-Montgomery) moved his reintroduced proposal to allow first time DUI offenders to place an ignition interlock device in their cars in lieu of loss of operating privileges, a proposal which moved out of the Senate Transportation Committee unanimously Wednesday.

According to those in the process, the legislation seems like all but a done deal.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015/Author: Jason Gottesman
Categories: News and Views

Education effort to help ignition interlock proposal next session

A proposal championed by Sen. John Rafferty (R-Montgomery) to allow ignition interlock devices to be used for first-time DUI offenders failed to gain the necessary support to cross the finish line this session, but the effort came close.

After being amended in House Bill 1357, which unanimously passed the Senate in early October, the legislation died sitting in the House Rules Committee—just two steps away from final passage—in the final days of the 2013-2014 legislative session.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014/Author: Jason Gottesman
Categories: News and Views
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